What makes us human? Do you want to know how we got to be that way? Or why we say things the way we do or how culture shapes us? Do you like digging in the dirt or talking to people? Anthropology, the study of people, our biology, languages, & cultures, present & past, is for you!



First Semester Planning

 We recommend that students register for approximately 15 credits each semester and no more than 16 credits in their first semester. Your schedule should be well-balanced and include coursework from a variety of subjects. A diverse schedule will help you begin your studies in potential majors and minors; explore a breadth of new knowledge across departments at Rutgers to meet SAS Core Curriculum learning goals; and survey broader academic interests through elective courses as you work to attain the required 120 degree credits for graduation.

Your schedule will look something like this:  

College Writing or English course per placement results (3 credits)

Major Exploration course (3-4 credits)

Major or Minor Exploration course (3-4 credits)

Course beyond main academic interest, such as SAS Core or elective course (3 credits)

Course beyond main academic interest, such as SAS Core or elective course (3 credits)

 Byrne or First-Year Interest Group Seminar (FIGS) (1 credit) 

 Total Credits: 15-16

 

Introductory courses recommended by faculty. Include at least one of these in your schedule:

Course Title

Course Number

Credits

Department

Culture & Social Life/or any Anthropology Course

070:101

3

Anthropology

Life of Primates

070:212

3

Anthropology

World Prehistory

070:112

3

Anthropology

Language, Culture, and Society

070:108

3

Anthropology

Extinction

070:111

4

Anthropology

 

Anthropology-Evolutionary Exploration Course(s) recommended by faculty. At least one of these will be included in your Fall schedule:

Course Title

Course Number

Credits

Department

Life of Primates

070:212

3

Anthropology

Culture & Social Life/or any Anthropology Course

070:101

3

Anthropology

World Prehistory

070:112

3

Anthropology

Language, Culture, and Society

070:108

3

Anthropology

Extinction

070:111

4

Anthropology

Your first year of college is an opportunity for you to explore fields of interest to enhance your understanding of yourself, the world around you, and your main academic and career goals. Think of your schedule as including courses you must take (English, courses to explore potential majors, etc.) and courses you can take (everything else!) All courses are part of your degree - if necessary, review the components of the SAS degree on this page.

Through these degree components, you will curate your own unique educational experience - but we understand that this level of flexibility and freedom can feel overwhelming for new students. Like a recommendation based on a book or TV show you enjoyed, the information below can help you identify related courses to consider in your first semester.

Course Title

Course Number

Credits

Subject on University Schedule of Classes

Intro to Sociology 01:920:101 3 Sociology (920)
Biology, Society, and Biomedical Issues 01:119:150 3 Biological Sciences (119)
Exploring Language 01:615:101 3 Linguistics (615)

 

 

Additional information Beyond the Classroom

For your first semester, we want you to focus on selecting appropriate courses, begin to understand the expectations and rigor of college, and identify resources to help you succeed at Rutgers. But, we also know that it is important to provide information for future planning.

In addition to the information below, students interested in exploring possible career options may find this resource from the Office of Career Exploration and Success helpful - you'll find that a degree in this subject prepares you for a wide variety of career options!

The Department offers 3 field summer field schools:

  • Fez Ethnographic Field School Morocco
  • Primatology, Wildlife Ecology, and Conservation in Kenya
  • Primates, Ecology, and Conservation in Indonesia.

The Department also grants credit for several Rutgers-run field schools, or for outside field schools with pre-approval.

 

The Department currently runs four labs, including: ALMA – Department of Anthropology Laboratory of MicroArchaeology (Dr. Dan Cabanes) and Paleoenvironmental Research Laboratory (Dr. Craig Feibel). Many students gain experience through work in these labs.

 

Internships are encouraged. With pre-approval, students can pursue outside internships for credit, by registering for our 3-credit anthropology internship course and completing the arranged assessments.

 

The department runs a strong honors program. In the first semester, students conduct research with the supervision of an advisor; in the following semester they prepare and defend a thesis, as well as presenting their work in an honors symposium (an event which has run for 10 consecutive years). They earn honors levels according to the quality of their work.

Anthropology provides good preparation for jobs that involve people skills and require an understanding of cultural differences. Acquired observation and research skills lend to many different careers. Gaining relevant work experience through internships, practicum, part-time jobs, or volunteer positions is critical. Typically students take a general curriculum as an undergraduate and specialize through graduate studies. Employment opportunities with a bachelor’s degree are increased by minoring or double majoring in another career-compatible field such as sociology, business, urban planning or public administration.

 

Recent graduates have gone on to work in many areas, including research on bones at Ground Zero, field research in Africa, a position at the UN University in Europe, Forensics Director, Research Assistant in the Department of Anatomy at Midwestern University in Arizona, joint project between A&M’s Institute of Nautical Archaeology and the University of Zadar to excavate the Gnaliç shipwreck.